Photo
europeanafashion:

A skull of bone decorates the breastpin which was a gift from author August Strindberg to senior physician Anders Eliasson who helped him during his life crisis in 1895. 
Photo: Mats Landin, Nordiska museet

europeanafashion:

A skull of bone decorates the breastpin which was a gift from author August Strindberg to senior physician Anders Eliasson who helped him during his life crisis in 1895. 

Photo: Mats Landin, Nordiska museet

(Source: nordiskamuseet.se)

Photo
europeanafashion:

In the 1930s, sun bathing became an inexpensive pastime while athletic and synchronised swimming also became popular. These trends were reflected in the swimwear of the time. Swimsuits were cut to show more skin, resulting in daring two-pieces that foreshadowed the bikini. The interest in sports resultated in swimwear that was more streamlined.Swim-and beachwear, 1933. Collection Nordiska museet. Photo: Erik Holmén. Collection CC-BY-NC-ND.

europeanafashion:

In the 1930s, sun bathing became an inexpensive pastime while athletic and synchronised swimming also became popular. These trends were reflected in the swimwear of the time. Swimsuits were cut to show more skin, resulting in daring two-pieces that foreshadowed the bikini. The interest in sports resultated in swimwear that was more streamlined.

Swim-and beachwear, 1933. Collection Nordiska museet. Photo: Erik Holmén. Collection CC-BY-NC-ND.

(Source: europeanafashion.eu)

Photo
europeanafashion:

Two-piece tennis dress for ladies, around 1903
Foto: Christa Losta
© Wien Museum
Ladies who played tennis had to be dressed in a dignified and respectable fashion. That called for a well-fitting corset under a long-sleeved and high-necked bodice. Skirts went down to the ankles and were slightly flared. Playing tennis without a hat, was inacceptable. Women were allowed to take part in forms of sport that called for a particular outfit. This was obviously only for the upper class who could afford it.

europeanafashion:

Two-piece tennis dress for ladies, around 1903

Foto: Christa Losta

© Wien Museum

Ladies who played tennis had to be dressed in a dignified and respectable fashion. That called for a well-fitting corset under a long-sleeved and high-necked bodice. Skirts went down to the ankles and were slightly flared. Playing tennis without a hat, was inacceptable. Women were allowed to take part in forms of sport that called for a particular outfit. This was obviously only for the upper class who could afford it.

Photo
europeanafashion:

"Girardi",  around 1890
Foto: Christa Losta
© Wien Museum
This straw boater is named after the famous Viennese Operettenstar Alexander Girardi (1850 – 1918). He wore a hat like this in his role in the Strauß Operette “Fürstin Ninetta”. The stiff boater with its dark ribbed band became so famous  that it was renamed a “Girardi” hat from then on. The Girardi became the summer hat for gentlemen in the 1880s

europeanafashion:

"Girardi",  around 1890

Foto: Christa Losta

© Wien Museum

This straw boater is named after the famous Viennese Operettenstar Alexander Girardi (1850 – 1918). He wore a hat like this in his role in the Strauß Operette “Fürstin Ninetta”. The stiff boater with its dark ribbed band became so famous  that it was renamed a “Girardi” hat from then on. The Girardi became the summer hat for gentlemen in the 1880s

Photo
macabrecantus:

Giuditta I-Gustav Klimt (1901)

macabrecantus:

Giuditta I-Gustav Klimt (1901)

(via life7imitates7art)

Photo
nanodash:

Your brain is such a worthless slacker. I’ll prove it.
Relax and stare at this image for a while. After said while (thirty seconds…ish), the colours will begin to disappear (no it’s not a gif). You can even make them go away completely.
What’s happening is called Troxler’s Fading. After a while of receiving the same non-changing information, your brain gets bored and just discards the information because it’s too busy keeping an eye out for more pressing, changing information, like tiger attacks.
You know how when you wear a watch for a while you stop noticing it. Same thing. Your brain is an idiot.
It is pretty though.

nanodash:

Your brain is such a worthless slacker. I’ll prove it.

Relax and stare at this image for a while. After said while (thirty seconds…ish), the colours will begin to disappear (no it’s not a gif). You can even make them go away completely.

What’s happening is called Troxler’s Fading. After a while of receiving the same non-changing information, your brain gets bored and just discards the information because it’s too busy keeping an eye out for more pressing, changing information, like tiger attacks.

You know how when you wear a watch for a while you stop noticing it. Same thing. Your brain is an idiot.

It is pretty though.

(via bravinto)

Photo
thestanfordgallery:

Armand Point
Lady with a Unicorn
c.1898

thestanfordgallery:

Armand Point

Lady with a Unicorn

c.1898

(via life7imitates7art)

Text

aimso:

Apparently how people feel after waking up from naps.

image

How I feel after waking up from naps.

image

(Source: copernicus-qwark, via bumbleshark)

Quote
"I don’t think people love me. They love versions of me I have spun for them, versions of me they have construed in their minds. The easy versions of me, the easy parts of me to love."

— (via anothermindpalace)

(Source: wordsthat-speak, via lazylee)

Quote
"You know what starts to piss me off after a while? It’s when couples always say the word: we. I hate it. We think. We may. We might. But, we feel, that’s the big one. Feeling is a solitary emotion. So you may feel like you’re falling in love, and I, me, might feel like I’m being caged."

— Shane McCutcheon (The L Word)

(Source: prettypretenti0us, via bravinto)